Part 1 of 3: Eye Health Facts vs. Fictions

FACTS AND FICTIONS ABOUT EYE HEALTH

Facts About Eye Health

Eating Carrots Will Improve Your Vision

FACT: They aren’t going to fix your vision BUT your eyes do need vitamin  A — a nutrient that is essential for good vision. Carrots are a great option but not the only option. Vitamin A can also be found in milk, cheese, egg yolk and liver (ok, we have to admit this one might not be our favorite option).

Sitting Too Close to the TV Will Damage Your Vision

FICTION: It might not damage your vision, but it CAN give you a headache. Children, especially if they’re nearsighted, may do this to see the TV more clearly. They may, in fact, need glasses.

Reading in the Dark Will Weaken Your Eyesight

FICTION: As with sitting too close to the television, this may cause eyestrain and give you a headache. But ultimately it will not weaken your eyes. HINT: If you are reading in the dark, we suggest asking Santa for a new Kindle White from Amazon 😉

There’s Nothing You Can Do to Prevent Vision Loss

FICTION: If you are having problems with your vision, you should immediately go see your doctor. Symptoms of blurred vision, eye pain, flashes of light, or sudden onset of floaters in your vision can be a sign of broader issues. Early detection is key. Treatments can correct, stop, or at least slow down the loss of vision.

Looking Straight at the Sun Will Damage Your Sight

FACT: Looking at the sun may not only cause headache and distort your vision temporarily, but it can also cause permanent eye damage. Any exposure to sunlight adds to the cumulative effects of ultraviolet radiation on your eyes. UV exposure has been linked to eye disorders such as macular degeneration, solar retinitis, and corneal dystrophies. The most dangerous time for sun gazing is during a solar eclipse. The brightness of the sun is hidden; but the dangerous invisible rays that permanently burn your eyes are not reduced.

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More info can be found on: “www.webmd.com/default.htm“.